My practice-led research has enabled me to comprehend the strong relationship between sound and space, and understand that the way we experience a space is largely determined by our aural perception and our physical presence within that space. As a musician existing primarily within the popular music sector, I have felt bound to the compositional confinements of conventional music that is determined by a series of rules and restrictions imposed by the spaces in which it is performed. Distancing myself from these confinements, my current artistic practice endeavours to experiment with alternative methods of creating and exhibiting sound.

The idea that sound - as a constructive material - can regenerate our experience of a given space has influenced my decision to develop work for a specific location, and in my pursuit of a suitable unconventional/non-art space I discovered a disused railway tunnel near Old Warden (Bedfordshire, UK). This dark and uninhabited structure presented me with an unfamiliar, yet fascinating platform for a sonic intervention; documenting my investigation through photographs, videos and sound recordings.

Tracing and overlapping visual intricacies within photographs has enabled me to translate the physical/structural information from the site into graphic notation. The graphic scores developed throughout this process are documents of musical ideas, which serve as a sufficient, but incomplete outline for a sound performance. My initial performance took place inside the cavity of the tunnel, as I felt it necessary to incorporate the sounds within the space they originated from. The composition exhibits my interpretation and rendering of the graphic scores on an electric guitar; creating a musical formation that is not structured or static.

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