Objective: The Edible Peace Patch at Lakewood Elementary is an attempt at many things. It is intended to educate children about science and organic agriculture, as well as create ecological values, but it is also a social experiment. It is an attempt to make children interested in school, improve their grades, introduce them to college students and help them realize that they too, can have higher education in their future. The Edible Peace Patch has only been around for little more than a year now, however so far, it seems like its working. Professor Curtis of Eckerd College hails from New England where the growing climate is strictly during summer vacation. His new residence in Florida however, has the perfect spring/fall growing season for the academic school year. Upon receiving interest in organic and sustainable agriculture from more and more students at Eckerd, the idea of creating these values in the next generation became more realistic. After he received permission from the principal at a nearby elementary school, Lakewood, it was the Eckerd students who volunteered their time to create the Edible Peace Patch in its first year. Since then, volunteering in Lakewoods garden has been offered as a Winter Term class, an independent study and an opportunity for the required service hours to graduate at Eckerd College. The volunteers work together with Margaret McCabe, the science coordinator and head of the Peace Patch at Lakewood, to create lesson plans and work with the kids. They teach the children about life cycles, identify plants and insects, and they even sample the vegetables. Science classes will perform experiments and do labs in the garden such as testing the best combination of soil, water, and sunlight on the plants. The students even say that the garden has helped them try new things and eat healthier. They also say that they enjoy school more and that other schools should be able to enjoy the same experience they do. Parents have become more involved in the PTA after the introduction of the garden and students grades have improved. The garden has begun to create a community in a low-income neighborhood and generated an interest in school in otherwise disinterested kids. Overall the Edible Peace Patch appears to be a huge success so far.

Loading more stuff…

Hmm…it looks like things are taking a while to load. Try again?

Loading videos…