In forming his conception of the filmic event Deleuze formulated three theses on movement which were derived from Henri Bergson's Matter and Memory. The theses are: 1- Movement is distinct from the space covered; 2 - Movement is made up of instants quelconques; and 3 - Movement consists of a change of duration. This paper closely examines these theses in order to arrive at an understanding of cinematic perception as Deleuze conceives of it. The overriding logic of the filmic event is, for Deleuze, one in which an apparatus of perception is put into play, an apparatus of 'cinematographic perception' which is in many ways superior to 'human' perception. The perceptions that the film camera-projector provides for us have the capacity to be more accomplished than our own, human capacities for perception. Thus, cinematic perception provides the possibility for a consciousness that introduces new possibilities of perception to the human. It is this capacity for new possibilities and new modes of perception that form the foundations for Deleuze's understanding of the filmic event.

Richard Rushton , Lancaster University, U.K.

I am currently working on a book on Realism and Reality in the Cinema which features a chapter on Deleuze.

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