Charles Hind shares how Palladio's treatise redefined the nature of publishing architecture and how it positioned his work within the continuum of ancient Roman architecture.

Photo credits: Titlepage to Book I of Andrea Palladio's I Quattro Libri dell'Architettura (The Four Books on Architecture), 1570; courtesy RIBA British Architectural Library. Elevation of the Palazzo da Porto, Book Two, I Quattro Libri; courtesy RIBA British Architectural Library. Courtyard elevation of the Palazzo da Porto, Book Two, I Quattro Libri, courtesy RIBA British Architectural Library. Studies for the plates of the Pantheon, Book Four, I Quattro Libri, 1560s; courtesy RIBA British Architectural Library. Villa Cornaro, Book Two, I Quattro Libri, courtesy RIBA British Architectural Library. Villa Rotonda, Book Two, I Quattro Libri, courtesy RIBA British Architectural Library. Ionic order, Book One, I Quattro Libri, courtesy RIBA British Architectural Library. Elevation of the Vitruvian peripteral temple, Book Four, I Quattro Libri, courtesy RIBA British Architectural Library.

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