I started out by calling it a kind of reassertion of the importance of space in critical social theory. But now it's gone so much broader that I'm saying it's the kind of sea-change in western intellectual thought, that in the nineteenth century we had what we look back on as a historical turn. Everything became historical, history spread to every discipline. Every discipline, every subject matter was interpreted from an historical perspective and this was accepted. This became engrained in our Western thought pattern. I don' t think the same thing happened in the East, but that's another story. But in the West, we privileged historical interpretation, especially over geographical or spatial interpretation, and space was pushed to the background. What we're seeing now is a kind of rebalancing. The spatial and the historical are beginning to become equal in their interpretive power.

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