In Washington, D.C., the most accessible art form isn't in the museums, it's on the metro. And nowhere within the city's transit system can you see more art on the walls than on the red line train between Union Station and Silver Spring. The ride along this section of the red line is a showcase of various works done illegally by graffiti writers. Large, colorful, boisterous, tags brandishing the names of unknown assailants. How do everyday commuters interact with these common, yet anonymous artworks? What does graffiti tagging mean in the context of the D.C. metro? The Red Line D.C. Project is a multimedia exploration of what happens when public space, public art and public transportation intersect. By following the development of the Metropolitan-Branch Trail, an outdoor path emerging within this storied graffiti space, Red Line D.C. intends to provoke a larger conversation around the overlapping issues of illegal public art -- anonymous identity, ownership and appropriation, community and communal space. Is Washington's metro graffiti nothing more than "visual litter" or a cause for conversation in transit?

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