A 1940s silent instructional film damaged by water shows different bee-keeping activities and how to make honey. The film illustrates how to work with the popular "movable frames" beehive. The idea of "movable frames" plus the damage on the edges of the film, were combined to make a film that also shows good filmmaking practices. It alludes to the disappearance of (16mm) celluloid film and it illustrates the fragile state our film patrimony is in, especially many overlooked educational and industrial films and other orphan films (hence the reference to B-Films).

The damaged patches and blotches at the edge of the film (included because I transferred the film with the largest probable frame setting, so that the sprocket were also included) create a vibrant visual pattern that adds extra rhythm to the images. This part of the film was also recorded through the optical sound-track reader of the film projector, and it serves as the film's main sound track. This rhythmical sound created by the film damage, is combined with recorded sounds of bees and other field sounds, as well as some melodies from the film Alien to create more drama and other sound effects.

The inserted images about how to treat film and how to make super-8 films, are taken from the fabulous Prelinger Archive. I found silent German film in 1999 in a room full of damaged film prints of the National Film Institute in Maputo (Mozambique).

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