I wanted to do a series of mathematical paintings using the golden ratio and square canvases. The course of study changed a lot through the process. My original plan was to paint abstractly a painting on a canvas with golden proportions, then later lay a golden spiral on top to see if there was any natural method to the madness. I created a moquette of the golden rectangle painting as practice. That being as far as that idea went, it was on 8"x10" cardboard, later framed. Found fern leaf symbolic of the golden section growth patterns later added. Each part of the plant mirrors the shape of the plant as a whole. A golden rectangle was constructed on a 26"x26" square yellow canvas with dimensions: 13"x21". This was intended to be the beginning of the painting but the canvas was stretched too loose, so it was abandoned. I then prepared a smaller, tighter, square canvas to paint a black and white grid. The reason for this was to visually map the surface of the square canvas as one by one inch sections of itself, reflecting the golden section studies of the fern plant and broccoli (didn't end up getting used in the video). The idea came from a pentagonal study in class on graph paper which later scanned, and increased to poster size (pentagonal checkerboard). In Constructing the Universe page 254 discusses how William Herschel managed to measure colors of visual light and how they can be matched to corresponding sound waves. The color painting was intended to have sound waves matching the color that was painted, beginning with the 7 colors visible to the human retina. The seven colors are made up of the Red, Blue, Green. A cone in the retina for each. The video shows manipulation of mirrored lines. The light is being looped on to infinity, which, in a television, is represented by the 3 simplified colors. These three colors are seen in the footage of the television up close, due to the camera's three-chip-technology, they are slightly diluted in saturation. Images of the pentad appear as well as what appear to be golden squares and triangles. The negative effect is the inspiration for the optical illusion painting. The "cafe wall illusion" discovered by Steve Simpson on a cafe wall in Bristol makes the parallel lines appear to be bent. The parallel lines need to be gray for this illusion to work. In my painting, i just left the space white since it is so small it appears gray anyway. This is because the human brain tends to group things together.

Loading more stuff…

Hmm…it looks like things are taking a while to load. Try again?

Loading videos…