The News of the World scandal "suggests that as a business, those newspapers in the U.K., which seemed to be thriving, may not be thriving quite as much as we thought," says Robert Teitelman, editor in chief of The Deal, in this video interview. As Teitelman points out in The Deal Economy blog post "Murdoch, Britain and the tabloid mentality," newspapers hung on to their audiences in Great Britain longer than in the U.S. in part because television was dominated by the BBC and a handful of channels, whereas in the U.S., cable TV's "narrow-casting" gave the media-consuming public many more options. "The question becomes, why did they misbehave so badly?" asks Teitelman of the News of the World. "I wonder whether they misbehaved because they could feel the competitive pressures, not just from other papers but from television -- ironically created by Rupert Murdoch himself with BSkyB." Not to mention the Internet. "Perhaps some of this was the desperate last throw of the dice," says Teitelman. - Mary Kathleen Flynn

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