Climate scientists have long sought to shock or shame American citizens into fully accepting the truth that humanity is causing global climate change. But climate policy remains low on the public agenda, and critics have fostered public doubts about climate science. Climate science and politics seem to be in crisis. Some respond with ever more urgent and sensational public information campaigns. Others blame democratic processes and call for environmental authoritarianism. A more promising response comes from those who advocate the democratization of global climate science and politics. What democratization might mean, however, is usually far from clear. In this presentation, Mark Brown explores the relationship between climate change and democratic politics and culture. Different ways of responding to climate change, he argues, have important implications for how we think about democratic citizenship in a global society.

Mark B. Brown –– Associate Professor at California State University, Sacramento ––is the author of Science in Democracy: Expertise, Institutions, and Representation published by MIT Press. His area of interest includes modern and contemporary political theory, bioethics, and science and technology studies. Brown was a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute for Science and Technology Studies at Bielefeld University in Germany. He received a Ph.D. in Political Science from Rutgers University.

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