'Champagne in the asylum' from the experimental music project 'Emotional machines' based on the use of everyday sounds instead of musical instruments.

Although traditional drums and vocals are present in the tracks the large porportion are sounds recorded from everyday life. In these tracks, cars, buses, garage doors and kitchen appliances etc are utilised. Influenced by the futurist art music movement of Musique Concrete of early 20th century led by Henri Schaefer, 'Emotional machines' is a testament to the ideas that were born more than a century ago before the age of technology.

Abstract:

Throughout the 20th century, the notion of what actually constituted music was under intense debate. Many emerging genres that broke with convention such as noise-art, electronic music, computer music, even punk rock, rap and hip hop, were considered 'non-music' or 'noise' at their inception and received strong resistance from critics and audiences alike.

Today we have a clearer understanding that the creation, performance, significance and even the definition of music vary according to culture and social context.

In his work 'Emotional machines', Taylor explores the boundaries of how everyday sound sources can be used in combination and in context with computer audio technology, within a diverse musical context.

We hear a plethora of everyday sounds and noises, crashed together with a select palette of traditional sounds to create a musical deconstruction that breathes life into the sounds that most people would singularly ignore as audio 'trash'. We hear the sounds and the machines that drive the technology come to life to create a remarkably musical experience.

'There is no noise, only sound...'
John Cage

'The border between music and noise is always culturally defined.'
Jean-Jacques Nattiez

'This musical evolution is paralleled by the multipication of machines, which collaborate with man on every front. Not only in the roaring atmosphere of major cities, but in the country too, which until yesterday was totally silent, the machine today has created such a variety and rivalry of noises that pure sound, in its exiguity and monotony, no longer arouses any feeling.'
Luigi Russolo

Filmed by Guss Mallmann
Edited by Rob Taylor

Subject result: 95 HD

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