Philipp Geist 2005–2011 Light Installations/ Video Mapping
HQ (1080p) youtu.be/Xdo9qMGxlLs

videogeist.com / philipp-geist.de

The Berlin artist Philipp Geist (1976) works internationally as a mulitmedia artist in the mediums of video- / light installation, photography and painting. In 2012 he showed his installation “time drifts - words of berlin” during the Festival of Lights at the Potsdamer Platz in Berlin, the installation “time drifts” was also shown in Frankfurt at the Luminale 2012 and earlier in 2011 during the 125th anniversary of the city of Vancouver, and in 2010, 'Time Drifts' could be experienced by the visitors of the Montreal Mutek festival for new media. In 2011, he has shown abstract photo works in a solo exhibition in the "Museum gegenstandsfreier Kunst Otterndorf, including the video mapping show 'Construction|Deconstruction' on the museum facade and the installation “Liquid Time” on the historical Water Tower in Cuxhaven. In December 2009, Geist showed a 4D mapping installation on the facade of the royal throne in Bangkok on the occasion of king Bhumibol's 82nd birthday. The one-hour-show was seen by 2,5 million of visitors. At the Glow Festival 2009 in Eindhoven he showed the light installation 'Timing'. In 2008, during the 'Long Night of the Museums', he exhibited his video installation 'Time Fades' at the Kulturforum. In 2007, he realized the video installation 'Time Lines' on the entire front of the Palazzo delle Espozioni in Rome. In 2006, he opened the Salon Noir within the context of the exhibition 'Melancholie, Genie und Wahnsinn' ('Melancholy, Genius and Insanity') in the Berlin Neue National Galerie. Together with the symphony orchestra OBC Barcelona and the Finnish sound ensemble Pan Sonic, Geist opened the Sonar Festival in Barcelona in 2004. He has exhibited his art work and audio-visual performances internationally at various renowned festivals and art spaces. Geist´s projects are characterized by their complexity and the integration of the location, the sound and moving images. In his video mapping installations, he avoids using canvasses and turns diverse architectures in moving, painterly light sculptures, which challenge the onlookers' perception of two- and threedimensionality.

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