During the past twenty years, the world’s most renowned critical theorist—the scholar who defined the field of postcolonial studies—has experienced a radical reorientation in her thinking. Finding the neat polarities of tradition and modernity, colonial and postcolonial, no longer sufficient for interpreting the globalized present, she turns elsewhere to make her central argument: that aesthetic education is the last available instrument for implementing global justice and democracy.

In essays on theory, translation, Marxism, gender, and world literature, and on writers such as Assia Djebar, J.M. Coetzee, and Rabindranath Tagore, Spivak argues for the social urgency of the humanities and renews the case for literary studies, imprisoned in the corporate university. “Perhaps,” she writes, “the literary can still do something.”

To read more about the book, visit hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn= 9780674072381

Loading more stuff…

Hmm…it looks like things are taking a while to load. Try again?

Loading videos…