TAHQUITZ is the second installation that is based on the "nukatem" or primordial being named Tahquitz from Cahuilla beliefs. The site of the Culver Arts Center, the former 1895 Rouse Department store had many physical and historical characteristics that lent to a revival of the Tahquitz theme. The anthropologist Lucille Hooper recorded Cahuilla Bird Songs in 1908 on an Edison Home Recorder using wax cylinders. These two minute snippets become the core of the installation's sound. The building has a large light well that is open to sky light. Attached to the surface of the skylight is a gigantic USGS map dated from this beginning of the 20th Century. Below are four axially located sound stations that are created using four columnated sound sources. This allows the viewer to walk into what sounds like a quiet space, but along the axis in the middle of the space there are four places where intense sound can be heard. First one hears the recorded voice of Elder Alvino Siva telling the story of this creature, in particular the story of a maiden who is kidnapped by Tahquitz. Hanging in mid space is a gigantic boulder, underneath which one hears the melodious voice of Erin Neff who configured Alvino Siva's stories to be sung and spoken; in this sense she is the maiden telling her story. Further on, one hears the vocalizations of the "voice" of Tahquitz created by Lewis deSoto and Erin Neff. As one approaches a table upon which is an Edison wax cylinder recorder/player, one hears the 1908 recordings of Cahuilla Bird Songs. On the back wall, a large image of a basket with a spiral design is projected against the back wall. This video documents each sound station and then documents a walk through along this axis.

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