Hegemonies of all sorts (economic, cognitive, ideological, political and scientific) affect the practice of anthropology. As a consequence, anthropological discourse is marginalized and its once fruitful method devalued. Le manifeste de Lausanne addresses this situation by reiterating the necessity to develop sophisticated methods taking into account the complexity of the groups under study and inter-relational connections that ensue. We reiterate the soundness of ethnographic methods and argue that their current complexification is an appropriate response to social demands and difficulties encountered by a too narrow scientific approach, which is particularly striking in the area of culture analysis. Anthropology must adopt a non-hégemonic standpoint; it should not contribute to the production of purely utilitarian knowledge nor should it satisfy itself with the expert standpoint. Anthropology should not either pretend to speak for the dominated. Anthropology does not stand for nor speak for the subalterns. It is first and foremost critical.

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