In 1965, the Catalan-born Mexican anthropologist Ángel Palerm (1917-1980), embarked on a project to train a corps of Mexican researchers capable of collecting ethnographic data in a manner that would enable them to analyze, predict and orient social change. Within a few years, this project would change the face and direction of Mexican anthropology as Palerm's students brought his model for research and training with them to new programs and institutes throughout the country. In this model—influenced by collective research programs elsewhere including Julian Steward's Puerto Rico project—fieldwork training occupied a key role and was guided by three basic principles: 1. That students should learn to do research doing research and not in the abstract setting of the classroom; 2. That they should be directly exposed to a professor's research and consequently to the connection between data collection and broader anthropological objectives; and 3. That they should formulate their own research projects based on their preliminary findings in the field and thus on Mexican realities. This training required that professors take groups of students with them into the field in a region where they themselves were conducting research. They would begin by taking the group to visit villages throughout the region to provide students with a regional perspective and the opportunity to choose a specific fieldwork site. Students would then go to stay in different villages to conduct an initial ethnographic study while meeting with the professor and group once a week to present, compare and discuss their findings and to learn and perfect different research techniques and methods. At the end of this training, students elaborated an ethnographic report, concluding with the formulation of a research question for their thesis project. Today, the model's legacy can still be observed in some programs in Mexico, in other Latin American nations and in other countries including the United States, Spain and Japan, in contrast to a global trend toward individualized research and reduced fieldwork training. Panel papers will situate Palerm's model within the changing social contexts of anthropological practice and will describe its adaptation to different institutions, historical moments and national anthropologies. They will compare it with other models and discuss how it has influenced or been influenced by them or how it has displaced or been displaced by them. In addition, they will address the model's benefits and limitations to graduate training and anthropological production, as well as the problems and challenges faced by professors and students, as, for example, institutional support wanes and demands for individual production increase. The ultimate objective in bringing together these papers is to foment discussion of fieldwork training and research methods that crosses national borders and assigns to third-world anthropologies an equal role in determining the discipline's future.

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