The work is a programmed water pavilion on a hexagonal outline with altogether sixteen walls of water shooting up from jets in the ground. The shape of the water pavilion is deduced from the isometric view of a cube made out of ten water walls inside, surrounded by six independent walls, so that the top view gives the impression of a cube nested into a hexagonal structure. The 2,50-metre-high water walls randomly rise and fall, describing all possible right-angled configurations of the space in defined sequences before changing shape and appearance. Initially the pavilion looks inaccessible for the viewer, but soon it is evident that the wall of water is divided into sections and the visitor is allowed to move within the structure from space to space, finding himself in differently shaped spaces inside, or suddenly on the outside of the pavilion without any possibility to control or govern the confinement or exclusion. This work has a highly performative character, offering the viewer an active and playful aesthetical experience. It provokes interaction between the viewer and the work, as well as the viewers with each other. Installed in an open, public place the work activates the space and invites the public to make use of the work, either as a space for seclusion and relaxation or the opposite, a place of pure joy and playfulness as well as a point of attraction for the city population.

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