In the drought-prone Northeast of Brazil more than 10 million rural people do not have regular access to clean and safe drinking water. Within the Brazilian government project "Um milhao de cisternas/One Million Cisterns", Italian NGOs Finisterrae and Dounia, together with local partner Fundaçao Dom Matthias Schmidt, help small-scale farmers make a living thanks to rainwater harvesting into cisterns, in the inland of Bahia State. The cisterns are made of concrete plates and are placed beside the household, gathering rainwater that runs off the roof: enough to supply a family with its drinking and cooking water for at least 8 months of the dry season. The cisterns are an environmentally responsible and economically sustainable way to face the lack of water: they enable people to remain on their land, even during the worst months of the drought and are built by members of the community themselves who are given training and access to the materials they need.
But sometimes the simplest and most reasonable solution turns into a thorn in the establishment's side...

This video is the trailer of a longer documentary, earmarked for UNESCO-IHE "The Water Channel" (thewaterchannel.tv). The project and its positive outcomes are narrated by the voices of the protagonists, their fights and their hopes.

Video footage was shot by amateur-filmmaker and volunteer Claudia Dorkenwald on a small SD digital camera, without external microphones, on sun-drenched and often windy locations.
Subtitles proofreading by James Bowman.

Loading more stuff…

Hmm…it looks like things are taking a while to load. Try again?

Loading videos…