This animation was created by Fairman Studios, LLC for the James A. Clark School of Engineering at the University of Maryland. It introduces the next generation of smart devices: Fischell’s drug-eluting stent minimizes tissue growth/restenosis of stent (clogging). Stent can be smarter – a clogged artery infected by bacteria can lead to bacterial growth and diversity. Bacterial cell-to-cell communication leads to secretion/perception of small molecules, where bacteria colonize the artery in multicellular units. Genes that control the pathogenicity of bacterial growth are regulated by their communication network. A miniaturized device might allow for perception and disruption of the bacterial communication network. Device might also measure and quantify images that deal with lesions. The use of smart sensors can allow for detection of proteins, nucleic acids or small molecules (e.g drugs). Proteomics or genomics information can shrunk and used inside this device. Programmable manufacturing capabilities would be useful to sense bacteria or other biomaterials, a device may go through a multi-enzyme pathway/manufacturing domain and can synthesize anti-microbial material that will eliminate pathogenicity of bacteria. Sitespecific, so no secondary side-effects. Capsular endoscopy currently used today, which uses batteries, and is a good model – nano-sized batteries are being used in nanodevices. Nano-biodevices of the future may also be able to report on a patient's state from within by sensing certain conditions (such as the presence and concentration of a medication that might cause a conflict with other treatment).

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