During the early morning hours on June 20, 2009, about forty members of the Chulu Beinan tribe, one of Taiwan’s indigenous groups of people, held a protest march. They marched in procession to the entrance of the Palan site, an ancestral spirit place proclaimed by the Chulu Beinan in the 1990s. The Palan site currently belongs to the national Forestry Bureau, and is managed by the local government. The protest emerged as a claim for Chulu Beinan regarding cultural interpretation on the Palan site as well as the management and ownership of the Palan site. Through discussion on politics of recognition and protection of indigenous cultural and intellectual property in the local context, this paper argues that most Chulu Beian concern about mutual respect and understanding between the minority Beinan and the majority Han, rather than possessing indigenous cultural and intellectual property in the legal systems.

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