This presentation focuses on recent and on-going archaeological work being conducted within a 9-acre parcel in the ahupua‘a (traditional land division) of Hau'ula on the island of O‘ahu. The project is sponsored through the UH Applied Archaeology Program and is being conducted in coordination with the landowner’s ‘ohana (family), community organizations, knowledgeable individuals, and the State Historic Preservation Division (SHPD). The archaeological project includes thorough background research, surface survey, field mapping techniques (tape and compass, total station, plane table), vegetation clearing, and potential subsurface testing. Documentation includes site forms, feature descriptions, detailed plan and profile maps to scale, photographs, and full stratigraphic recordation. Major features discussed include a traditional Hawaiian religious structure, Maunawila Heiau, and mound and terrace features. Also discussed are standard procedures for vegetation clearing, detailed documentation, community involvement, and the process of conducting an archaeological project in the state of Hawai'i.

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