Drawing inspiration from Pier Paolo Pasolini, director David Lynch, artist Gina Pane, teenage culture, hardcore and classical music, Claude Leveque skillfully uses light and sound to transform the exhibition space and create a physical effect that echoes through the body. Often relying on staging devices driven from theater, film sets, and an accumulation of everyday mass-produced objects, Leveque's ephemeral installations address our sensorial perception through created atmospheres of emptiness. Inspired by collective mythologies found in institutions such as schools, prisons or hospitals, Leveque's works are less recreations of emotional experiences than celebrations with points of attraction and repulsion hovering between the flamboyant and the immaterial.

For the Dallas Biennale, Leveque develops a large-scale, site-specific project entitled La mort du cygne (The Dying Swan, 2012) combined with his work Chant (Song, 2011). Both recreate the atmosphere of a film set. Like a threatening stormy sky, a thousand torn-black umbrellas are float over the whole gallery ceiling accompanied by a creaking sound of metal dissonance. The dreadful journey ends with a garden shed; inside lies a long black wedding dress conjuring up the image of a ballerina's tragic and graceful death. In a structure outside Dallas Contemporary, the installation Le droit du plus fort (The Law of the Strongest, 2000) presents a metal forest of car exhaust pipes, music by rock band, Van Halen, blasts out guitar solos creating a metaphoric setting.

Born in 1953, France. Leveque lives and works in Montreuil and Peteloup, France.

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