SD, 21 min 49 sec, in English, with Japanese Interpretation

Japanese Nuclear Scientist and Japanese and US medical doctors to discuss current radiological health conditions and concerns in Japan after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactor catastrophe.

WHAT: A press conference about the on-going, rarely publicized and still grave situation around the stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors, featuring a nuclear scientist from Japan, and first hand medical reports of clinical and on site observations in Japan related to the Fukushima radiological contamination, with discussion of the immediate needs to protect Japanese citizens now living in contaminated areas, for better monitoring of radioactive content of food, and for the cessation of incineration and burying of radioactive tsunami rubble throughout Japan.

WHERE: Rissho Kosei-kai 320 East 39th Street, New York, NY 10016 (between First Ave. & Second Ave.)

WHEN: Friday, May 4, 2012, 10AM-11AM

WHO: Dr. Andy Kanter, MD, MPH, President of the Board of Directors of Physicians for Social Responsibility, has studied radioactive plume projections from nuclear reactor accident scenarios and other public health impacts of nuclear radiation dispersion. He is the director of Health Information Systems/Medical Informatics for the Millennium Villages Project for the Earth Institute at Columbia University as well as an Asst. Prof. for Clinical Biomedical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology at Columbia University. Will speak about the need for accurate and timely information regarding exposure to radioactivity in order to protect and promote public health.

DETAILS: Hosted from Japan by Voices for Lively Spring, Human Rights Now, and Physicians for Social Responsibility, the best-known nuclear scientist and concerned medical doctors from Japan and USA will share their experiences and speak about the on-going nuclear crisis in Fukushima. They will discuss the under-reported health consequences after the nuclear disaster, health risks resulting from inadequate food safety standards, and the environmental dispersion of radioactive materials by government burning of radioactive disaster debris. Voices for Lively Spring, a Japanese citizens’ group, Physicians for Social Responsibility, a US and international medical NGO, and Human Rights Now, a Japanese international human rights NGO, feel that the international community is not adequately informed about the evolving “current status” and the remaining serious problems in Japan after the nuclear disaster. The nuclear scientist and medical doctors from Japan and US will be available for media interviews.

BACKGROUND: A year after the nuclear disaster in Fukushima there has not been a significant improvement in protecting the local communities in Japan from exposure to radioactivity. Radioactive materials are still being released into the environment – air, soil and ocean – from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Many citizens still live in areas where the radiation level is dangerously high. The Japanese government continues to keep its citizens in harms’ way by applying a 20mSv per year standard to establish evacuation zones. Citizens in the rest of Japan also remain in danger of being exposed to unsafe levels of radiation due to widespread radiological contamination from the accident, food safety standards that are not strict enough to protect children, and the Japanese government continuing to burn and bury the radioactive disaster debris in municipalities across the nation.

PHYSICIANS FOR SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY: Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR) advocates for sound public health policies regarding exposure to radioactive and other toxic materials. Fukushima presents an immediate challenge to protect those individuals most endangered by exposure to dangerous levels of radioactivity, and to adequately and openly track the health consequences of the ongoing irradiation of populations. PSR was founded in 1961 and succeeded in achieving the Limited Nuclear Test Ban Treaty that ended the global radioactive contamination produced by atmospheric nuclear bomb testing. PSR shared in the 1985 Nobel Peace Prize awarded to International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (IPPNW), for building public pressure to push their governments to end the nuclear arms race.

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