Filmed by Roger Hale in March/April 2012:
Kashgar city, Xingiang province in the Wild West of China, where they speak a Turkic Uighur language, write in Arabic script, are mainly Muslim and wear a wonderful array of head-gear. 78% of the population is Uighur and the Chinese are trying to alter the balance to nearer 78% Han, systematically pulling down the remnants of the 1000-years-old mud ramparts of the old city and Disneyfying a small part of the Old Town before bulldozing the rest . This team of samza makers are turning out the Kashgar equivalent of baozi , filled with a ubiquitous mix of finely chopped mutton, mutton fat from the fat-tail of the local sheep and plenty of onion, garlic, salt and pepper. The meat and fat are chopped on a tree-stump-chopping block using a great scimitar-shaped cleaver, prior to mixing by hand in big shallow bowls. You can see a little of the mixing process on the left of screen. Samza, the equivalent of samosa , may be either baked in a tandoor or steamed. The most common method of cooking is baking and the wood/coal/charcoal fired stoves are permanent structures found on every street in the non-Han parts of the city.
Stuffed with chopped mutton, mutton fat, onion, herbs, spices.

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