This is the final edition (for now) of an audio/video work titled ...the red hills of Georgia..., a work based on three important Civil Rights (or lack of rights) speeches from 1963: Dr Martin Luther King Jr's famous "I Have A Dream" address from the August, 1963 march on Washington, DC; George Wallace's infamous "Segregation Now, Segregation Tomorrow, and Segregation Forever" address; and the third, the least known speech, former North Carolina Governor Terry Sanford's 1963 address to the Press Club of North Carolina, colloquially referred to as the "Second Emancipation" address, in which Sanford calls for greater social and economic equality in North Carolina - a bold, progressive move couched in a sort of passivity for a Southern governor of the period.

The speakers, and their images - all fifty years in the past - vie for continuous attention, as our collective memories flicker on-screen and certain indelible moments stay with us. These messages, clear in intent and powerful (or outlandish), are forced into a simultaneity, and with Wallace's speech, anyhow, the only way I could rework or repattern his lunatic words was to create an ostinato out of "segregation now" - to the point of absurdity (fitting). Moreover, it was the only way I knew how to make a single word of his - the ugliest word uttered in his speech - beautiful. And I may have failed even there.

This is my second full audio/video work, and it's the second time I sat down and challenged myself with a fair amount of cringe-inducing source material. However, using King's and Sanford's speeches as both source and to serve as a larger rhetorical framework, I at least had source material that was uplifting, inspiring, and built on messages of love.

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