W.J.T. Mitchell is a scholar and theorist of media, visual art, and literature associated with the emergent fields of visual culture and iconology (the study of images across the media). This lecture argues against the view that digital photography does not have the firm grip on reality that was claimed by traditional photography. On the contrary, as Mitchell explains, digital photography offers a “double entry bookkeeping” of reality that “expands the potential scope of photographic truth-claims along with the potential for lying.”

A Professor of English and Art History at the University of Chicago, Mitchell is editor of the interdisciplinary journal, Critical Inquiry, and the author of numerous publications including What Do Pictures Want? The Lives and Loves of Images (2005).

Video courtesy of Chicago Access Network Television (CAN TV)

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