In this video, virtual community pioneer Howard Rheingold interviews longtime educator Jackie Gerstein about assisting students in developing lifelong learning skills through passion, projects, and play.

Here's a brief blog post from Howard introducing the video (plus, important relevant links):

"At my elementary school in Phoenix, Arizona, problem students like me were often sent to the art teacher’s room. Unfortunately for me, my objection to sitting in a little desk, arranged in rows with other little desks, then moving in single-file to another room full of desks in rows whenever a loud bell rang, made me a problem student. Fortunately for me, the art teacher was my mother, beloved by many as Mrs. Rheingold. After the pin-drop quiet, pin-neat order of our homerooms, the happy chaos of Mrs. Rheingold’s art studio was like travelling to an altogether different dimension. Mrs. Rheingold’s philosophy of teaching art was that all human beings are creative innovators who have a need to express themselves creatively and take joy in it, but many — most — people are shut down at an early age. Someone looks at the page you are happily scribbling and tells you that your horse doesn’t look like a horse, and you decide to leave art to specialists. Mrs. Rheingold didn’t teach technique. She gave permission to play. Thank you, mom. By now, art classes in US public schools are notions from a distant past. I was heartened when Sir Ken Robinson received world-wide attention for his TED talk, “Do Schools Kill Creativity?” With so much attention to core curriculum, the creativity-blunting effects of schooling have not been at the forefront of discussions about how to fix educational institutions. I was heartened again to see that my mother’s philosophy of teaching creativity through permission rather than technique is being advanced by some of today’s educators. Jackie Gerstein, for example.

I wasn’t surprised to learn that she was not only an early advocate for “the flipped classroom” but spent a year thinking in public on her blog about what you do with the physically co-present classroom when traditional lectures have been moved to YouTube. And I love that she applied the flipped classroom frame to tinkering and making -- introducing me to the delicious term “maker education.”

One thing that video conveys that is hard to get across in text: the passion of the speaker for her calling. Among other things, I asked her about “passion-based learning,” an idea she picked up from Sheryl Nussbaum-Beach and extended to include “project-based” and “play-based” learning. Passion, projects, and play. Sounds like fun. In the hands of Mrs. Rheingold or Jackie Gerstein, it’s also about connecting with the deep joy humans experience in learning until we’re schooled out of it."

Important, relevant links:
Mrs. Rheingold: rheingold.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Mom98BdayCloseUp-sm.jpg
TED Talk - Sir Ken Robinson: "Do schools kill creativity?": youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=iG9CE55wbtY
Connected Learning: connectedlearning.tv
Jackie Gerstein on "the flipped classroom": usergeneratededucation.wordpress.com/tag/flipped-classroom/
Maker education: usergeneratededucation.wordpress.com/2012/06/16/the-flipped-classroom-the-full-picture-for-tinkering-and-maker-education/
Passion-based learning: plpnetwork.com/2011/04/22/passion-based-learning-in-the-21st-century-an-interview-with-sheryl-nussbaum-beach/
Passion-play-based learning: usergeneratededucation.wordpress.com/2012/05/08/pbl-project-passion-play-based-learning/

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