Forerunners of Queercore and Riot Grrrl, Toronto's preeminent feminist art-punk combo Fifth Column gets the tribute it has long deserved. Kevin Hegge's doc also doubles as a fascinating time capsule of the city's vibrant alternative culture of the 1980s and early 1990s. Hegge uses an abundance of film, video, and print material to powerfully evoke their Toronto, before the queercore ethos that Fifth Column and pal Bruce LaBruce cooked up wended its way into the lives and minds of misfits far from Queen Street And though Hegge doesn't quite untangle the band's very messy history, he captures the equally unruly energies that made Fifth Column matter.

Hegge interviews Fifth Column members Caroline Azar, Beverly Breckenridge and G.B. Jones, along with other collaborators including Bruce LaBruce, Vaginal Davis and Kathleen Hanna. It makes for an in-depth look at the work and the era that it came out of, and the implications and challenges of that history for contemporary queer culture. Their legendary fights were a critical part of a tremendous body of work and way of life that waged total war against art practice, gender norms, and politics.

She Said Boom tells the inspirational story of a small group of outsiders creating a new reality. Their world exists in opposition to a culture that excludes and rejects them, but it is no utopia. Strong personalities with strong ideas collaborate and also come into conflict and out burst great queer films, zines and music. Alienated from everyday life, a small group of women artists in Toronto in the 1980s created a queer subculture that was destined to catch fire and influence many bohemians and outsiders around the world.

Alive with great quotes and challenging ideas, the film shows Bruce LaBruce pointing out that the group was not orthodox feminist, while Kathleen Hanna discusses how Fifth Column was inspirational because they were punk in idea but not in musical genre. G.B. Jones explains that the band rejected the idea of authenticity as being completely alien, and embraced the superficiality of bubble gum groups, insisting that something artificial is more real than something with the pretense of authenticity, calling into question the premise of documentary. Fifth Column tears down norms and assumptions to the end!

"The interviews are all shot Forerunners of Queercore and Riot Grrrl, Toronto's preeminent feminist art-punk combo Fifth Column gets the tribute it has long deserved. Kevin Hegge's doc also doubles as a fascinating time capsule of the city's vibrant alternative culture of the 1980s and early 1990s. Hegge uses an abundance of film, video, and print material to powerfully evoke their Toronto, before the queercore ethos that Fifth Column and pal Bruce LaBruce cooked up wended its way into the lives and minds of misfits far from Queen Street And though Hegge doesn't quite untangle the band's very messy history, he captures the equally unruly energies that made Fifth Column matter.

Hegge interviews Fifth Column members Caroline Azar, Beverly Breckenridge and G.B. Jones, along with other collaborators including Bruce LaBruce, Vaginal Davis and Kathleen Hanna. It makes for an in-depth look at the work and the era that it came out of, and the implications and challenges of that history for contemporary queer culture. Their legendary fights were a critical part of a tremendous body of work and way of life that waged total war against art practice, gender norms, and politics.

She Said Boom tells the inspirational story of a small group of outsiders creating a new reality. Their world exists in opposition to a culture that excludes and rejects them, but it is no utopia. Strong personalities with strong ideas collaborate and also come into conflict and out burst great queer films, zines and music. Alienated from everyday life, a small group of women artists in Toronto in the 1980s created a queer subculture that was destined to catch fire and influence many bohemians and outsiders around the world.

Alive with great quotes and challenging ideas, the film shows Bruce LaBruce pointing out that the group was not orthodox feminist, while Kathleen Hanna discusses how Fifth Column was inspirational because they were punk in idea but not in musical genre. G.B. Jones explains that the band rejected the idea of authenticity as being completely alien, and embraced the superficiality of bubble gum groups, insisting that something artificial is more real than something with the pretense of authenticity, calling into question the premise of documentary. Fifth Column tears down norms and assumptions to the end!

Teaser Edited by Rhett duPont

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