The goal of this paper is two-fold. First, we present The New God Argument, after which we discuss some implications for Mormonism. The New God Argument concludes that we should trust that our world probably is created by advanced life forms more benevolent than us. The argument is based on assumptions widely shared among both secular and religious persons, and is consistent with modern science and technological trends. Although the logic of the argument holds, independent of any potential theological implications, we feel that the implications for Mormonism are profound. The God in question in this argument is a natural material God that became God through natural material means, suggesting how we might do the same. As emphasized in the argument, benevolence, not only power, is among those means and essential to them. This is the God of which Joseph Smith taught us. Most philosophical arguments for God's existence have aimed at justifying traditional Christian theology. However, Mormon theology, particularly as advocated by Joseph Smith near the end of his life, diverges from tradition to posit emergent gods that organize worlds from existing matter according to existing laws. The New God Argument does not contend to infallibly prove God's existence or to provide a relationship with God. It contends only to demonstrate that a common worldview, informed of contemporary science and technological trends, leads to and is wholly compatible with faith in a particular kind of God.

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