The first mode of transportation for early settlers was the sea. Lighthouses were as important to them in their trade and commerce, particularly in shipbuilding, as the railway was after Confederation. Many colonial or "first-generation" lighthouses – those built before 1873 – are octagonal shaped, and were constructed when timber was abundant in this province.

The "second- generation" lighthouses, those built after 1873, are square tapered. Some of the largest timber had to be imported from New Brunswick as the Island timber supply had been depleted by the shipbuilding industry. Each lighthouse had its individual day markings and distinguishing flash patterns.

West Point Lighthouse, constructed in 1875, was the first of the second generation lighthouses on Prince Edward Island. The reconstructed gable-roofed lighthouse keeper's house with lean-to storage provides an example common among lighthouses of this style.
Combining distinctive architecture, folklore, shipwrecks, and dramatic scenery on the western entrance of the Northumberland Strait, the West Point Lighthouse began a second career as a lighthouse museum, country inn, restaurant and craftshop in 1984.

Like all of PEI the area is famous for its lobster with bright red shells and juicy tender meat. Once so common that they were used as fertilizer, lobster has now become a gourmet delicacy. Lobsters have ten legs, beady eyes, long antennae and a crust-like shell. The bright red colour characteristic of the lobster is only achieved by cooking. When alive, lobster are usually greenish-blue and speckled with dark spots. The meat, when cooked, is a delicate white tinged with red.

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