The short film St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves is a both a student project and a fan tribute to the incredibly talented author Karen Russell. It tells the tale of children that are originally raised by their werewolf mother, but are taken out of their natural environment to be socialized into "naturalized citizens of human society." From one perspective, the film can be viewed as an allegory for what white pioneers did to Native American children: placed them in schools, cut off their hair, took away their traditions, language and religion. From another perspective, however, it’s a metaphor of growing up, a story about the human experience. Throughout the film, we are guided by Anne's perspective, a girl that is right in the middle of the pack: not the worst student, but not the best either. Even though the nuns serve as the antagonists in the film, their evil is surface level. Anne, however, represents a more authentic evil, a more relatable one; it's strange and layered. Her internal dialogue exposes the psychological oppression and projection that exists within an oppressed group. Her eldest sister, Mirabella, is a character that never ends up conforming, and because of this, she becomes the scapegoat of the community. She reminds them all of what they once were (which is now seen as barbaric, ugly, and undesirable) and consequently, any self-hatred or shame gets projected onto her. The film essentially explores the tragedy of growing up, revealing that the more we learn what it means to be socialized, the more we lose sight of our most fundamental desire: the human connection.

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