Gregory Bennett’s video works are part of an ongoing series that employ 3-D animation to create views of intricate digital colonies in which can be read as simultaneously utopian and dystopian. His diverse sources include the photographic studies of humans in motion by Eadweard J. Muybridge, the elaborate geometric choreography of 1930s Hollywood musical choreographer Busby Berkeley, the looped animations of nineteenth century optical toys, Renaissance depictions of the multiplied body, and the aesthetics of the contemporary digital video game.
Developing out of Bennett’s Utopia series of videos, which featured continuously panning horizontal views of digital landscapes, Omnipolis presents a Babel-like structure, with a viewpoint which tracks vertically upwards.
This often tenuous structure is populated by groups of assembled and reassembled Sysiphus-like replicated figures organised into units of performed actions, loops, and cycles, creating ongoing series of patterns of movement vocabulary. The never-ending loop situates the figures in a kind of eternal present, relentlessly mobile, rooted in modules of asynchronous time in which temporal progress is both enacted and arrested.
Here the corporeal body is transformed into proliferating avatars inhabiting a range of environments where existence is either tenuous, or wholly subsumed into a synthetic ecosystem. These spaces can be read as a series of psychological landscapes, as representations of hermetic digital colonies - depictions which fluctuate between the utopian and dystopian, or as figures enacting some enigmatic ceremonial.

gregorybennett.org

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