Bob St. Peter, a landless farmer and the head of Food for Maine’s Future, knows first hand the struggles of family farms in America today, from the increasing prices of land to the lack of capital and knowledge transfer between aging farmers (never-left-the-landers) and a new generation of young adults moving away from urban environments to pursue the agrarian lifestyle (back-to-the-landers). Amid these challenges, the economics of food continue to reinforce the development patters destroying family farms in the U.S. Bob discusses these topics, and how communities can look elsewhere for inspiration and solutions for resisting, overcoming and replacing current patterns of land concentration and the devaluing of agrarian work.

This video is part of the Land & Sovereignty in the Americas series, which pulls together research and analysis from activists and scholars working to understand and halt the alarming trend in "land grabbing"-from rural Brazil and Central America to US cities like Oakland and Detroit--and to support rural and urban communities in their efforts to protect their lands as the basis for self-determination, food justice and food sovereignty. The Land and Sovereignty in the Americas series is a project of the Land & Sovereignty in the Americas (LSA) activist-researcher collective, coordinated by Food First with the Transnational Institute.

Recorded Saturday, June 30, 2012 in Oakland, CA.

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