Esther Schapira is a German journalist and filmmaker, currently politics and society editor at the German public television network, the Hessischer Rundfunk. Schapira is co-author of The Act of Alois Brunner, and producer of two award-winning documentaries, Drei Kugeln und ein totes Kind, about the death of Muhammad al-Durrah in Gaza in 2000, and Der Tag, als Theo van Gogh ermordet wurde, about the killing in 2004 of Dutch filmmaker, Theo van Gogh. (...) In 2009, she produced a second documentary about the death of al-Durrah, Das Kind, Der Tod, und Die Wahrheit. Schapira and Georg M. Hafner report another Palestinian boy died earlier that day, and that images of the boy who died may not have been of Muhammad.[France 2 responded angrily, threatening to end cooperation with ARD.

The film was shortlisted for an Association of International Broadcasting Award in September 2009.[

The Muhammad al-Durrah incident took place in the Gaza Strip on September 30, 2000, on the second day of the Second Intifada, amid widespread rioting throughout the Palestinian territories. Jamal al-Durrah and his 12-year-old son, Muhammad, were filmed by Talal Abu Rahma, a Palestinian cameraman freelancing for France 2, as they sought cover behind a concrete cylinder after being caught in crossfire between Israeli soldiers and Palestinian security forces.

(...)

Fifty-nine seconds of the footage were initially broadcast in France with a voiceover from Charles Enderlin, France 2's bureau chief in Israel, who did not witness the incident himself but got all information by phone from the cameraman, telling viewers that the al-Durrahs had been the "target of fire from the Israeli positions," and that the boy had died.[2] After an emotional public funeral, Muhammad was hailed throughout the Arab and Muslim worlds as a martyr.

France 2's news editor said in 2005 that no one could say for sure who fired the shots, but other commentators, including the director of the Israeli government press office, went further, saying the scene had been staged by Palestinian protesters.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muhammad_al-Durrah_incident

Esther Schapira is a German journalist and filmmaker, currently politics and society editor at the German public television network, the Hessischer Rundfunk. Schapira is co-author of The Act of Alois Brunner, and producer of two award-winning documentaries, Drei Kugeln und ein totes Kind, about the death of Muhammad al-Durrah in Gaza in 2000, and Der Tag, als Theo van Gogh ermordet wurde, about the killing in 2004 of Dutch filmmaker, Theo van Gogh. (...) In 2009, she produced a second documentary about the death of al-Durrah, Das Kind, Der Tod, und Die Wahrheit. Schapira and Georg M. Hafner report another Palestinian boy died earlier that day, and that images of the boy who died may not have been of Muhammad.[France 2 responded angrily, threatening to end cooperation with ARD.

The film was shortlisted for an Association of International Broadcasting Award in September 2009.[

The Muhammad al-Durrah incident took place in the Gaza Strip on September 30, 2000, on the second day of the Second Intifada, amid widespread rioting throughout the Palestinian territories. Jamal al-Durrah and his 12-year-old son, Muhammad, were filmed by Talal Abu Rahma, a Palestinian cameraman freelancing for France 2, as they sought cover behind a concrete cylinder after being caught in crossfire between Israeli soldiers and Palestinian security forces.

(...)

Fifty-nine seconds of the footage were initially broadcast in France with a voiceover from Charles Enderlin, France 2's bureau chief in Israel, who did not witness the incident himself but got all information by phone from the cameraman, telling viewers that the al-Durrahs had been the "target of fire from the Israeli positions," and that the boy had died.[2] After an emotional public funeral, Muhammad was hailed throughout the Arab and Muslim worlds as a martyr.

France 2's news editor said in 2005 that no one could say for sure who fired the shots, but other commentators, including the director of the Israeli government press office, went further, saying the scene had been staged by Palestinian protesters.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muhammad_al-Durrah_incident

Loading more stuff…

Hmm…it looks like things are taking a while to load. Try again?

Loading videos…