This summer Sprout Films collaborated with Ami Vitale, Oxfam America, and the Rockefeller Foundation to share Mrs. Murrey's story.

It's barely 7:30 a.m. and already the dirt road, red and rutted, that leads to the Tanykina dairy plant about an hour and a half drive from Eldoret in Kenya streams with farmers and their children. They come by foot, by bike, by motorcycle to deliver the creamy white commodity on which their lives depend: milk--drawn from the cow udders that have given this place its name. Among the early risers is Joina Chepkalum Murrey, a stout woman with a warm smile and a multitude of responsibilities that stretch across three generations.

"If I didn't have all the responsibilities I do I would have been a rich woman," says Murrey, a longtime widow, sitting in the hot stillness of the mud-walled home she built for one of her sons. Instead, she is devoting her senior years to ensuring her grandchildren get an education, that medical bills for an epileptic son are covered, and that there is food on the table for everyone. Milk, now marketed through the Tanykina dairy, has helped to make all of this possible.

The Tanykina dairy is part of The East Africa Dairy Development (EADD), a project designed to boost the yields and incomes of millions of small farmers in Africa and other parts of the developing world so they can lift themselves and their families out of hunger and poverty. heifer.org/eadd/about/

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