In our previous lessons on the book of Proverbs, we have examined the place of proverbs in non-literate societies and the need to internalize wisdom – which is a unique emphasis for Proverbs. We worked through an introduction of Proverbs including its name, outline and distinct sections, authorship, and date. We covered the purpose statement for the entire book found in 1:1-7, and we discussed the literary technique of conveying wisdom through speeches given by the father to his son – often marked by the phrase “my son”. Among the seven speeches, we noted the unique structure of speech two, which in fact is a 21-line poem. Speech four emphasized the generational transference of knowledge from grandfather to father to son. We found a content anomaly between speech five and six that fits better at the end of speech five than the beginning of speech six – though where it actually fits is debated by many scholars. Speech seven sounds like more a story-parable illustrating the dangers of falling prey to the devious ways of a prostitute.

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