The bivalve Solemya velum was one of the first chemoautotrophic symbioses discovered and provides an excellent model organism for symbiosis research because it can be collected easily from coastal sulfuric sediments and maintained under experimental conditions in the laboratory. The species is distributed along the eastern coast of North America where it makes Y-shaped burrows in organic-rich sediments ranging from inter- to subtidal. Positioning itself at the triple junction of the Y, the clam alternates between actively pumping oxygenated water from the upper arms of the burrow through the mantle cavity and across the gills and accessing sulfide diffusing up from the anoxic zones below and pumped through a ventral incurrent opening in the mantle.

References
Roeselers & Newton (2012) On the evolutionary ecology of symbioses between chemosynthetic bacteria and bivalves. Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology 94(1):1-10

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