In “The beginning of language,” a small book made from wax-covered paper hangs behind the throat of a translucent fabric sculpture depicting a mouth and neck. Onto the book are projected images of birds flying out from the center with their flights timed to the whispered Sanskrit vowels on the soundtrack. The birds leave trails of outlines of their former positions that dissolve briefly into mathematical formulae before disappearing. Each bird is mirrored rorschach-like onto both pages, suggesting both vocal chords and vertebrae. Sanskrit is sometimes thought to both represent and evoke the manifestation of the universe.

The work is from a group of sculptures called “Works on Becoming.” The series incorporates translucent objects and surfaces onto which imagery from a single projector evocatively floats and multiplies. Thematically the series is informed by: creation myths from around the world; recent scientific work on how existence comes into being (including my layperson's musings on cosmology and string theory); and my own sense of how something comes out of nothing in our consciousness and our perception.

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