Sixteen men from different states in Mexico live and work at a farm in North Carolina for six months out of the year. They share their ideas of family and community, both here at their camp and back in their hometowns. The importance that their families hold in the workers’ hearts and minds is reflected in the way that they have built their community here in North Carolina. “Aqui estamos a gusto porque llegamos y trabajamos juntos,” says Enrique Niño, the son of Ignacio Ramirez Cervantes. While it is his first year working in North Carolina, his father, Ignacio, has been coming for over 13 years. This sense of family is especially seen in the father and son duo that care for and serve as leaders for the farmworkers. Ignacio is not only a role model for his son but also for the younger guys at the camp who respect and take into consideration the guidance Ignacio provides. Enrique states, “Si es mas ayuda mi papa porque así como dijo el yo no sabría como agarrar un camión, como llegar aquí, como enfrentar me con el patrón o a si.” In this way, the farmworkers give and receive support and encouragement from each other and also from the broader community.

The nature of their interactions with each other and the way that they work together has caught the attention of the health workers at the migrant clinic. The farmworkers attend an evening migrant clinic in Zebulon, where Blanca Brito and Ricky Simms work. Blanca is a WIC Counselor, and Ricky is the security guard. They both share their thoughts on the farmworkers and their journeys. These perspectives of community are connected into our documentary to create a patchwork of others’ to make a diverse and unique puzzle of community life.

By 2013 SAF Interns Jaslina Paintal, Edith Valle, and Beatriz Cruz

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