The Albany Bulb is a landfill peninsula located along the east shore of the San Francisco Bay.
It has been a source of controversy ever since contractors started dumping construction debris there since 1963. The San Francisco Bay plays a critical role in the sustainability of the economy of California. After the dumping was stopped at the Albany Bulb Landfill in 1983, soil accumulated and plants began to take root. The industrial landfill looks rather lush in comparison, today. Still the only individuals who regularly use it are homeless people (camp dwellers,) some renegade artists, and dog walkers. The landfill has transformed the original tide lines, brought oil, lead paints, asbestos, and other industrial toxins to the area, as well as providing a homeland for a group of cast offs for over twenty years.
This year the Albany City Council voted to begin transferring the land from the city of Albany over to the California State Park System. Transferring this land will also mean that sixty-five people who have long been camped at the Albany Bulb, will be made, once again, homeless. This upcoming eviction will bring changing tides for a group of people, a body of water, and a spit of land. The work-in-progress video clips to be utilized for interactive mobile media devices and on-line resources highlights these transformations and embraces ideas of placemaking, a theory used in public art and communities around the world to design, create and enliven public spaces promoting health, happiness, and well being. The people, plants, animals, architecture and artwork that have accumulated on the peninsula create place and culture. The video clips utilize storytelling and cultural productions by landfill residents which embrace ideas of placemaking as a springboard to explore the Albany Bulb, a unique eco system on the brink of change.

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