2005 - How well does an atheist family do compared to a Christian one? Kelly Stonerock (37) and her husband, Pastor Jeff Stonerock (39), live in a cozy suburban Michigan home with their four children, Devon (10), Justin (9), Hunter (3) and Jesse (2), and their niece Taylor (9) and nephew Jacob (6), whom they took in after their parents abandoned them. The Stonerocks are pillars of their community. Jeff is the pastor of the town’s Pentecostal church and Kelly maintains her perfect image as the church’s “First Lady.” Her regimented and fast-paced daily schedule includes home schooling the six children, working out at the gym, playing team sports and hosting regular Bible-discussion groups with other women from the church. Kelly keeps the children on an active social schedule involving church activities and volunteer work. She sees to it that the family gets plenty of exercise by engaging in many outdoor activities, including soccer, basketball, baseball, hunting, canoeing, hiking, sledding and hunting. The entire family shares in the household cleaning. The kids must abide by the “Stonerock Behavior/ Consequence Plan” which Kelly, Jeff, and the children wrote together to clearly outline the discipline required in the house and what happens if the children don’t abide by the rules. In addition to lots of family time, Kelly and Jeff still manage to make time for each other, having regular date nights and vacations. They work hard to make ends meet on Dad’s income alone, but have succeeded in paying off their home mortgage. The family’s commitment to religion is evident in every aspect of their lives.

Kelly travels to the urban Georgia lived-in home of Amber Finley (30) and her husband, Reginald (31). The Finleys are atheists raising three children, Dorian (11), Reginald Jr. (3) and baby girl Ryan (1). Dad Reggie spends 80 hours a week working from home, broadcasting his own internet radio show and running his own website devoted to atheism. He believes that God does not exist and convinced his wife to give up her Christian beliefs in favor of atheism when the couple first started dating. Amber is a stay-at-home mother responsible for cleaning the house to Reginald’s standards, and spends the rest of her day on the computer, surfing the Internet or obsessively playing computer games. Though Amber and Reginald are at home together all day, they rarely spend quality time with each other, as Reginald is obsessed with his work, which barely supports the family. After school and day care, the children spend their evenings in front of the television and computer or quietly in their rooms, so as not to disturb Dad while he’s broadcasting a show. Amber and Reginald try to maintain discipline by taking away the kids’ privileges, but to no avail. The family has few friends and doesn’t even know the neighbors.

In the first week of the swap, devoted mom Kelly bristles at having to leave the kids at daycare and cries when she finds out how little time atheist Reggie spends with his son. Meanwhile, godless Amber is surprised by the narrow-mindedness of Kelly’s friends -- who’ve never met an atheist before -- and dissolves in tears when the Stonerocks’ niece reveals she’s not treated the same as the other kids in the family. In week two of the swap, when the wives change the rules and turn the tables, Kelly converts Reggie’s radio broadcast into her own “Bible Gal” show, and Reggie sobs as Kelly confronts him about his shortcomings as a father. And in the other house, non-believing Amber puts Pastor Jeff in his place, shocking him by enrolling his kids in day care and fining him a dollar each time he mentions God, collecting enough money to throw a huge party for the kids. At the end of the swap, when the couples are reunited, will they find common ground or are their differences too great to overcome?

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