Central to the reconfiguration of urban condition is that gradual change occurs, allowing people to develop independency from private mobilisation. In the first stage of applying this template the reliance on cars needs to be significantly reduced, so if people could keep their car, but not bring it into town, a facility would be required on the periphery to house it. In the early design, a surface car-park, stretching like a band along the town edge, creating instead of a green belt, a grey belt, a development limit seemed a good approach. But, with more and more design consideration, it became apparent that to remove private motorised transport had potentially huge consequences. Delivery vans, builders vans, skip lorries, ice cream vans would all have to go. Also, petrol stations, mechanics, car sales, car valets, MOT centres all had to be re-located. Some form of public transport network running within the town would be required, an electro-bus or monorail, even though the emphasis was on walking and cycling everywhere, it is understood that this is not necessarily possible for all members of the community. All these additional factors indicated that a large surface car-park would not meet the needs of the facility, and that what would be required is a centralised facility, one location, where all these programmes overlap. A 'Gateway to Utopia'.

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