Here's a video that summarizes my experience researching the Kermiss festival in Northeast Wisconsin, home to America's largest community of Belgian settlers. Evolving over a more than 150 year timespan, festival traditions, activities and customs had changed significantly since the first days of settling to a new land. For a project in visual culture and anthropology, I met with members of the Wisconsin Walloon community to discover what Kermiss once meant and what it continues to mean in the present, as a once typically Walloon celebration is interpreted, enacted and enjoyed by increasingly larger audiences. The Kermiss season entails a weekly circuit of parades and celebrations, as the festival moves to a new town every week, celebrating pride in local town identities and institutions, paying tributes to a shared agricultural heritage, and acting as an important venue for the self-representation and recognition of a township, its constituents, extended families and surrounding communities. As a snippet of a longer video project that is accompanied by an ethnographic research paper and image collection that illustrate the broader historical context of the festival, this video provides a quick glance into contemporary Belgian baking and parade happenings.

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