In this video you will hear several varieties of British and Irish (and one of North American) English speech, none of them so common as to be able to be accurately labelled 'standard', all subtitled and in this order:

1. 'Standard' British English (upper class)

2. Regional British English (north-west, working class)

3. Regional British English (midlands and north-east, working class)

4. 'Standard' British English (upper class) and regional English (Republic of Ireland, classless)

5. A little North American English (so clear!) then regional British English (Scotland, working class)

6. Two pretty good British impressionists give you: (a) regional British English (London, working class), (b) regional British English (north / north-west, middle class), (c) regional British English (Wales, middle class), and (d) regional British English (west / south-west, middle class)

7. 'Standard' British English (middle class) contrasted with regional British English (Scotland, working class)

8. Regional British English (south, working class) contrasted with 'standard' British English (middle class)

9. Regional British English (Scotland, working class)

There are naturally more varieties of British natives' speech than you'll hear here. But I hope this goes a little way towards helping dismiss the idea of anything approaching 'standard' English as well as the 'native-speakers-are-best-to-learn-from' view, which is getting pretty outdated now.

It's clearly far from true.

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