This video is a montage of found footage. The idea is to compare the deaths of fallen soldiers in battle to raindrops in an ocean. It is not meant to belittle wartime casualties -- it is supposed to make the viewer think about how they perceive death in war. For example, when one considers the Spring Offensive from World War I, there were 900,000 casualties from that one battle. That's an astounding number, and one that no human being can break down into individual digits. So what can we do, as humans, to handle the massive figures? We group the numbers as a whole because we can't handle all the separate parts.
I compared this inability to process a large mass made up of small parts to a rain storm. When you look at a raging storm cloud, you see all its violence as a collective whole. However, if you were to zoom in on each individual raindrop that makes up the storm, they'd appear innocent, intimate, and harmless. When compared to war, the same thing happens. If you see a battle from a distance, there is no sympathy, and it is viewed as nothing but pure violence. But, if you were to see an individual get wounded, fall to the ground, suffer, and potentially die, your perspective on the whole battle can change completely. The video jumps back and forth between images of war and images of falling water in increasingly “close” ways to try and emphasize the relationship between the two to the viewer.
Toying with our (human being's) perception of importance, and our sympathies, when considering the whole and the individual, was the driving concept behind this work. It's supposed to make us question how we think when we see a broad view and a close up one of dramatic events.

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