A database is where you store your data. But in practice, your database scheme can quickly grow to become an untamed beast that makes you cry at night. To improve performance, you have the infamous `full_name` column living next to `first_name` and `last_name`; and then there’s `canonical_full_name` for proper search; and `needs_thumbnail` to keep track of thumbnail operations; and an extra table to normalize some relationships needed in the UI; and so on. Every time you change the UI or add features, your database scheme gets more complicated. Maybe you did survive the software updates, the not-so-automatic migrations, the if statements littered around and the special `rebuildCache` methods. But now your f*^%$@ users want syncing, and you fear for your sanity. Here is the problem: your database is used both for **storing** the actual data and for **displaying** that data and managing the UI. Your data model is torn between two antagonistic goals, and you have a kitchen sink database. I propose a different approach where you explicitly separate those two functions, and with which you can ultimately get your sanity back.

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