Testing out Graeme's point-and-shoot camera at 240fps. Thanks to Sherrin, Todd and Kate for participating.

What
Capture the feeling of a World Cup moment by recording the reactions of you and your friends.

How
Use video cameras to record you and your friends watching the World Cup Finals and share the best moments online.

Why
Because it’s fun and with the technology we have, we can. It’s pure play; you, your mates, the World Cup and a camera.

Football tricks (how to get a good video moment)

Set up the video camera to face you and your mates,
Hit record,
Forget the camera and watch the game,
After the game, edit your recording and publish the best moments on vimeo, youtube, facebook etc,
Add a description (e.g. Australia v Chile, the awesome moment Cahill scores for Australia, me and my mates at Antonio's place),
Add tags to help other people find your video of the same moment (e.g. fanreactions, #worldcup2014, australia, chile, cahill, goal)

Extra time (useful tips)

If possible, use cameras that can record at high frame rates (50/60fps, 120fps, 240fps, etc.) such as GoPros, dSLRs, and smartphone apps to capture moments clearly, especially if you want to make slow motion video,
Record in as high quality as possible; HD format recommended (1080P or 720P),
Make sure there is enough light to see you and your friends clearly,
Make sure you have enough battery power and space on your camera to record the length of the game (or at least each half),
Share the most interesting expressions from you and your mates rather than uploading the whole video (unless the whole video is awesome.)
Find other videos and check out the reactions from World Cup fans who watched the same game.

Slow motion action

If you like, use a video editing program such as iMovie (Mac) or Windows Movie Maker (PC) to slow down or speed up your video footage. Check out this example: Three on the couch.

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