No art without its proper art space. Imagine the ancient cave drawings without their rock walls hidden away from the harsh daylight - in sand, carved in tree bark, or tatooed on the skin of the cave people? If they were, we wouldn't know. Modern art has found many proper spaces - from the high-brow gallery to the street. But graffiti doesn't do it in a small frame, and the metro car or big ugly wall is nothing artistic without the graffiti. Without any artistic space, the German paintings hidden away for decades in a dank Munich apartment existed only in the memory banks of art history. Paintings can be displayed to good effect in many settings, even in your living room if the art doesn't overtax your wall space. But few installations, performances (including of course musical performances) or sculptures can be thus accommodated. I'll stop just short of saying that the art space makes the art, but it has the power to turn really any object into an object d'art. The museums of modern art occupy the highest position in today's universe of art spaces. Like churches, once the premiere art spaces, they are embued with the sacred. With the proliferation of art spaces on the Internet, modern art museums only gain further in exclusivity. But they are not in control of the art video. They make some room for video displays in their sacred halls, but they will remain an afterthought to paintings and installations. And they don't allow the kind of pace of consumption that we take for granted as surfers. Any HD screen from the smart phone to the home theater provides an alternative art space. And the number of visitors on video art sites far outstrips that of museums of modern art. We increasingly make our own art spaces and modes of art appreciation. And we use our own ideas to decide what is art, what is good art, and what perhaps even partakes in the sublime.

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