To reserve musicians for your wedding or other type of celebration, contact us at:
Email: ecmusicnj@gmail.com
Call: (908)464-0038, (908)451-1955

"The Prince of Denmark's March" is more commonly known as the Trumpet Voluntary by Jeremiah Clarke.

This piece of classical music is for the bride who wants to make a grand entrance into the church. Here it is being performed by a duo consisting of a trumpeter and the church organist. The musicians were up in the balcony, the acoustics in the church were spectacular and the music selection very moving.

Please note: We usually recommend to our newly engaged couples that they hire the church organist. These musicians are familiar with the nuances of the particular instrument. Church organs vary greatly, so it is highly recommended that you contract the individual most familiar with your church's organ.

The Order of the Music at a Wedding Ceremony:

Processional refers to the music that is being played as the bridal party enters the church, once all the guests are seated. One piece of music for the bridal party, then another for the bride.

The prelude refers to the music performed prior to the recessional, as the guests are being seated.

The recessional refers to the music at the conclusion of the wedding ceremony. The bride and groom exit first, followed by the bridal party, the parents, and the congregation. Modern couples are changing the rules to suit their needs, the family dynamics and their religion.

About this song
It is customarily played as the bride enters the church with her father, the processional. "The Prince of Denmark's March" was composed by Jeremiah Clarke. It is called The Prince of Denmark's March; but commonly called: The Trumpet Voluntary. It was composed for the keyboard, probably,around 1700. This music can be heard at a number of royal weddings, most notably at the 1981 wedding of Prince Charles and Lady Diana.

Visit our Website:
musicnewjersey.com

Like us on Facebook:
facebook.com/EntertainmentConsultants

Follow us on Twitter:
twitter.com/#!/MusicNewJersey

Follow our Pinterest Boards:
pinterest.com/MusicNewJersey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jeremiah Clarke (c. 1674 – 1 December 1707) was an English baroque composer and organist.

Biography
Thought to have been born in London around 1674, Clarke was a pupil of John Blow at St Paul's Cathedral. He later became an organist at the Chapel Royal. After his death, he was succeeded in that post by William Croft.

Clarke is best remembered for a popular keyboard piece: the Prince of Denmark's March, which is commonly called the Trumpet Voluntary, written about 1700. From c. 1878 until the 1940s the work was attributed to Henry Purcell, and was published as Trumpet Voluntary by Henry Purcell in William Sparkes's Short Pieces for the Organ, Book VII, No. 1 (London, Ashdown and Parry). This version came to the attention of Sir Henry J. Wood, who made two orchestral transcriptions of it, both of which were recorded. The recordings further cemented the erroneous notion that the original piece was by Purcell. Clarke's piece is a popular choice for wedding music, and has been used in royal weddings. Most notably the wedding of Prince Charles and Lady Diana Spencer in 1981.

The famous Trumpet Tune in D (also incorrectly attributed to Purcell) was taken from the semi-opera The Island Princess, which was a joint musical production of Clarke and Daniel Purcell (Henry Purcell's younger brother)—probably leading to the confusion.

Loading more stuff…

Hmm…it looks like things are taking a while to load. Try again?

Loading videos…