In June 1955, the organization of the 17th edition of the Olympic Games was assigned to Rome. Next came the building of the Olympic Village, which during the games in 1960 gave hospitality to more than 8000 athletes and journalist. The project was a part of the works done in Rome for the 1960 Olympics, in an area originally meant to be a public park by the city urban plan, which included the hovels of Campo Parioli, close to the Tiber and the Foro Italico. The whole area was turned into residential zoning in order to built the houses first for the athletes and eventually for the citizens.The families of Campo Parioli were moved to the non-central areas of the city and the INCIS (Istituto Nazionale per le Case dei Lavoratori dello Stato) appointed to the most notably Italian architects such as Amedeo Luccichenti, Vincenzo Monaco, Adalberto Libera and Luigi Moretti to plan and complete the housing project. They worked on the project, planning low-rise buildings that were different in shape but shared common features, such as concrete beltcourse, white ribbon windows and yellow bricks on the outside. The buildings were surrounded by vegetation: 800 tall trunk trees, bushes and shrubs were planted. An ideal neighborhood from an architectural point of view, an area that is distant from its inhabitants, in which a slightly vague and terminational exterior image hinders the usage of its spaces by a simple and non-dynamic populace. In 1960 the construction of the entire area was completed and it has maintained its original shape up to now. Flora still remains the most striking element of the Village. After 50 years nature is more present than people. Once there were several shops but now they almost disappeared. The Olympic district is very close to downtown Rome, nevertheless it appears as a desolate, nearly uninhabited place. Nonetheless, it is only thanks to the vital influence of Renzo Piano's Auditorium that this area of the city started living, yet maintaining that special small-town modesty towards imposing architecture and by population itself with young alternative people capable of cracking the idea of a closed neighborhood, typical of state-founded housing.

j vimeo.com/12678840

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